IVI system sandboxing: The next frontier for in-vehicle upgrades

With the rapid advancement of mobile, cloud, and embedded technologies, it may surprise most that In-Vehicle Infotainment (IVI) systems are typically developed four to five years before the vehicles are release to the market. In fact, most 2014 models are running IVI systems from 2009. By most modern industry standards, a five-year development lifecycle is unacceptable. So how is it that one of our most valued commodities – the automobile – is subjected to such a technological lag?

Primarily, the bloated IVI development lifecycle can be linked to two factors: driver safety and vehicle longevity. Although most people associate IVI systems with just navigation and entertainment, these systems also interact with many critical vehicle safety components such as driver assistance, engine control, and vehicle sensors. This means that all IVI systems must go through significant testing, evaluation, security, and certification processes. In addition, vehicle manufacturers need to ensure that an IVI system will remain operational for the duration of a vehicle’s 10-15 year lifespan.

Unfortunately, even the sleekest of vehicles on the market today are equipped with IVI systems that contain old software and unattractive user interfaces. Furthermore, consumers do not currently have the option to upgrade their IVI systems through new software rollouts or third-party applications. And while some people do trade in their vehicles every two-to-three years, for most of us purchasing a car is a long-term investment. According to automobile information analysis firm R.L. Polk & Co., the average age of automobiles in the U.S. is rising. Assuming this trend continues, many consumers will be stuck with an outdated IVI system for the next nine-to-ten years.

Customizing the car

What if IVI systems could be customized and continuously upgraded like smartphones or tablets? What if drivers could listen to music through their Pandora account, share their location via Facebook, or take a call on Skype? What if online marketplaces like iTunes and Google Play started offering IVI-specific apps? With the rising demand for consumer device customization, it’s just a matter of time before these rhetorical scenarios become the new standard.

The Android platform is especially ripe for IVI customization efforts, as it is an open source wonderland for developers. Whereas iOS remains a proprietary Apple technology, Google has opened Android up to a wide variety of uses, which is why it is currently dominating in the mobile space.

However, Android does have some major drawbacks that must be addressed before it can be utilized for IVI applications. For example, from an automotive perspective, Android has a slow boot time and does not meet the industry’s strict security and stability standards. The average boot time on an Android-based device is 40 seconds. While this is an acceptable length of time for a mobile device that rarely gets shut off, it becomes a bigger problem in a vehicle. Since most people immediately begin driving after turning on the car, a long IVI system boot time would result in drivers pulling up a map or a play list while the vehicle is in motion – further adding to distractions while driving.

Furthermore, drivers cannot simply restart their vehicles if the IVI system crashes. An unstable Operating System (OS) is inconvenient in a mobile device, but it’s downright dangerous in a vehicle. And if a driver downloads a third-party IVI app whose settings override those of the vehicle’s operational components, it could seriously compromise the vehicle’s security and functionality, from altering diagnostics and sensor parameters to disabling emergency services.

While slow boot times and operating speeds can generally be resolved by modifying the Android OS distribution for an “automotive-grade” platform, the real challenge lies in balancing the innovation of Android with the stringent safety and reliability requirements of the automotive industry. How can a single system be flexible and modular for consumer customization while at the same time ensuring uncompromised security and reliability?

Hypervisor sandboxing splits safety-critical from software-upgradeable

The unfortunate truth is that there is no way to combine these two conflicting demands – nor should we try. Instead of managing one complex and potentially flawed OS, the goal should be to run two completely functional and sandboxed systems. By leveraging an open source, “bare metal” Xen hypervisor, developers could simultaneously run two different OSs on a single System-on-Chip (SoC) to provide:

  1. Highly reliable automotive-grade Linux or Real-Time Operating Systems(RTOSs) like Autosar and QNX for mission-critical vehicle software
  2. Highly customizable Android for infotainment software

A hybrid architecture that is based on a Type-1 hypervisor would allow developers to create an Android-based IVI system without compromising the functionality, security, or reliability of the vehicle’s operational software. Critical components such as vehicle sensors, diagnostics, and emergency services would never be impacted by third-party apps, as they would be completely enclosed within their own respective OSs (Figure 1). Sandboxed Linux and Android operating systems give developers the freedom to create truly customizable infotainment software without negatively impacting a vehicle’s security or reliability.

21
 Figure 1: A hypervisor approach can effectively separate infotainment apps from critical automobile systems into a single hybrid software architecture.(Click graphic to zoom by 1.9x)

Although still a relatively untapped field, it’s only a matter of time before IVI systems become just as customizable as any other mobile device. While Android still has some issues around reliability, security, and speed to address before it can become truly “automotive grade,” it is an ideal OS for IVI customization. By modifying Android to accelerate operating and boot time speeds, and by leveraging a hybrid architecture to separate a vehicle’s mission-critical and infotainment components, developers can begin shaping a new and industry-changing market for automotive software.

 

refer to:http://embedded-computing.com/articles/ivi-sandboxing-next-frontier-in-vehicle-upgrades/

Fuel Economy Improvement Achieving to 75% from Exa’s simulation

Exa Corporation isa global innovator of fluids simulation solutions for product engineering, stated that Cummins Inc. and Peterbilt Motors Company, the first automobile computer companies to announce their SuperTruck for the Department of Energy (DOE) SuperTruck Program, credited Exa’s technology and engineering expertise as instrumental in the success of their recently announced vehicle. Exa worked with engineers from both Cummins and Peterbilt to perform vehicle pc and thermal simulations to achieve ignificant efficiency improvements throughout the tractor, trailer and engine. These simulations, done long before a physical prototype was ever created, helped this SuperTruck exceed the required 50% efficiency improvement, and deliver a 75% more efficient truck — ahead of schedule.

The remarkable improvements were made possible through the collaboration of two world-class automobile  computer companies. They evaluated the entire truck from the underhood cooling requirements and engine housing, to every part of the tractor and trailer. “It was not one aerodynamic or thermal simulation that made the difference,” stated David Koeberlein, Cummins’ Program Lead for the SuperTruck program. “Using Exa’s vehicle pc  simulations, we were able to rapidly find and address areas of thermal and aerodynamic efficiency throughout the truck — it was a critical resource for our vehicle pc team.”

The in-vehicle computer project started with Cummins’ engineers digitally packaging their new, energy efficient automobile computer, designed with a waste heat recovery system, into the Peterbilt tractor CAD geometry. They then added heat exchangers, and simulated the thermal performance of the complete system. “Exa’s technology was able to quickly demonstrate, through simulation alone, optimal cooling package design,” remarked Jon Dickson, Cummins Engineering Manager of Advanced In-Vehicle Computer Integration. “To package the new waste heat recovery condenser, we had to redesign the vehicle heat exchanger system and use a non-traditional layout. We were able to use Exa’s PowerCOOL and PowerTHERM to identify areas to improve thermal performance while maximizing aerodynamic efficiency — years before any vehicle was built.”

At the same time, Landon Sproull, Peterbilt Chief Engineer, and Rick Mihelic, Peterbilt Manager of Vehicle Performance and Engineering Analysis, were evaluating their vehicle pc and trailer combinations for aerodynamic/thermal performance. “Over the course of three years, we ran hundreds of simulations to test and analyze every part of this in-vehicle computer using Exa PowerFLOW,” stated Mihelic. “We designed a complete new SuperTruck aerodynamic package which included visible devices such as trailer skirts and wheel well covers as well as unseen, but critical, underbody shields that optimize airflow and thermal efficiency.” Sproull added, “Using visualization of the simulation results, our team analyzed each area looking for opportunities for improvement. Our designers and engineers could easily review and discuss results and optimization options — something simply not possible in a wind tunnel. It was this comprehensive in-vehicle computer analysis that helped us to achieve our extreme efficiency savings that exceeded even the aggressive goals set by the DOE.”

“Each day our customers seek efficiency improvements using our aerodynamic, thermal and acoustic solutions,” remarked Stephen Remondi, Exa’s President and CEO. “We have been working with Peterbilt for many years and were pleased to see them use Exa’s solutions so effectively as part of this important initiative that will benefit us all in the end.”

About Exa Corporation

Exa Corporation develops, sells and supports simulation software and services to enhance automobile computer product performance, reduce product development costs and improve the efficiency of design and engineering processes. Exa’s simulation solutions enable our customers to gain crucial insights about design performance early in the design cycle, thus reducing the likelihood of expensive redesigns and late-stage engineering automobile computer changes. As a result, Exa’s customers realize significant cost savings and fundamental improvements in their engineering development process. Exa’sproducts include, PowerFLOW, PowerDELTA with PowerCLAY, PowerVIZ, PowerSPECTRUM along with professional engineering consulting services. A partial automobile computer customer list includes: AGCO, BMW, Ford, Hyundai, Jaguar Land Rover, Kenworth, MAN, Nissan, Peterbilt, Renault, Scania, Toyota, Volkswagen, and Volvo Trucks.

refer to:
http://embedded-computing.com/news/exas-improvement-cummins-peterbilt-supertruck/

Acrosser’s Embedded Products on Media Coverage

In February, Acrosser Technology was interviewed by Elektronik Praxis and Digitimes, two news sources which share a great reputation in the embedded technology industry in Germany and Taiwan. Here we share with you a summary of the two interviews.

There are many industrial computer manufacturers in Taiwan, and in this competitive environment, it pays to be smart. For over two decades, Acrosser Technology’s claim to fame has been its staffing structure: one third of the staff belongs to the Research and Development Department. For IPC manufacturers, a larger number of people engaging in research stands for a greater effort in design, communication, verification and validation behind each industrial product. For instance, all car PCsfrom Acrosser have undergone a series of anti-shock/vibration tests before final production. Both of Acrosser’s in-vehicle computers, AR-V6100FL and AR-V6005FL, were awarded the Taiwan Excellence Award, and Acrosser is still supplying these car computers to our system integrators globally. The fanless car computers feature an Intel serial processor (i7, i5, Celeron), and have rich I/O interfaces and an integrated graphics processor, allowing each customer to find the best in-vehicle solution to fit their industry.

As for the embedded computer market, Acrosser has chosen its fanless embedded system, AES-HM76Z1FL, to reach its target audience. With a fanless design, Core i series processor, and an ultra slim body as its 3 main features, the so-called “F.I.T. Technology” that makes up the AES-HM76Z1FLhas garnered numerous business inquiries since its release last year. The standard I/O ports (HDMI, VGA, USB, audio and GPIO) and small form factor make AES-HM76Z1FL an appealing solution for the following applications: security control, banking systems, ATM, kiosk, digital signage, e-commerce via cloud applications, network terminal, and more. With its optional Mini PCIe socket for a 3.5G or WiFi module, the capability of wireless communication allows AES-HM76Z1FL to be a feasible addition to any transportation management control system.

To further promote the advantages of our book-sized mini PC, Acrosser has launched a free Product Testing Event starting in January 2014. Acrosser received a great deal of positive feedback from the security, financial, and entertainment industries. If you are looking for embedded products with great computing performance, do not miss the final chance to submit your application now!

Aside from its traditional industrial PCs, in-vehicle computers and embedded systems, Acrosser has a wide array of other product lines, including all-in-one gaming systems, single-board computers, panel PCs, industrial touch displays, rackmount servers and network appliance devices, waiting for you to make your embedded idea a reality.

Original articles:
http://www.elektronikpraxis.vogel.de/sps-ipc/articles/433172/

http://www.digitimes.com.tw/tw/iot/shwnws.asp?cnlid=15&cat=30&cat1=10&id=0000368249_26U3LBNW3F20COLW64SF5

Contact us:
http://www.acrosser.com/inquiry.html

Connected but private: Transporter aims to be your off-cloud Dropbox

Can the gap between personal and cloud storage be easily bridged? Connected data’s rackmount aims to create remote storage data that’s not actually stored in the cloud.

The cloud may be the future of all things storage, but the present is more complicated: it can be expensive, potentially insecure, and you’re left trusting a third party with all your data.

That’s what inspired The Transporter, a Kickstarter project started by former employees of Drobo. Transporter aims for something more secure and distributed, while still being sharable. The concept largely works like Dropbox, with a Transporter folder that lives on your desktop and syncs with files stored on the physical Transporter drive (which resides someplace you designate). You can easily give others network security access to specific folders, although they will need to register for a free Transporter account.

The physical Transporter is the big difference; all your data lives on your own rackmount, rather than a third party’s cloud servers (which could be located in data centers anywhere in the world). In addition to giving you the peace of mind of having the drive under your personal control, having the Transporter on your local home or business network appliance will make for faster transfer speeds while you’re on-site. (When accessing the Transporter remotely, of course, you’ll be subject to the host location’s upstream and downstream data speeds.)

The rackmount itself includes housing for a 2.5-inch SATA hard drive, with an Ethernet and USB port on the back. It can work with Wi-Fi, but you need to buy an adapter that connects via USB. It sounds a lot like other hard-drive housings, but the Transporter’s meant to be used in tandem with other Transporters. Plug one in somewhere, and it can share its drive with other rackmount, syncing and copying all data between them, depending on how you configure your folders. Even better, if any drive were to fail, the information can redundantly stored on every other Transporter connected to the network, in addition to PCs that have the shared Transporter folder.

For network security, the strongest part of The Transporter’s pitch comes down to pricing. Yes, Dropbox offers a lot of the same functionality without the need for hardware, but it gets pricey quickly: 100GB is $100 per year and 500GB is $500 per year. For large storage amounts, the Transporter’s no-subscription-fee model is much more affordable: 1TB Transporter for $300, 2TB Transporter for $400, plus you can buy the hardware without storage for $200 and add your own hard drive later. It might make a lot of network security sense for professionals that need to offer access to large files and don’t want to deal with antiquated FTP transfers.

What’s the difference between this and any other networked hard drive? Theoretically, ease of use and a setup process that may be able to easily bypass firewalls and port settings, like the Pogoplug. In our meeting with Connected Data, no demo of the software was shown; all we saw was the Transporter box itself. It’s reasonably attractive, but ultimately the success of the network server hardware is going to come down to the quality of the software and overall experience.

The Transporter’s laser-focus on data storage and backup means it’s not quite as flexible as a more traditional network attached storage (NAS) drive. Sure, you can store your personal photos, music, and videos on a Transporter, but it lacks a built-in media server (such as DLNA or AirPlay) that makes it easy to access those on say, an Apple TV or PS3, without leaving a separate computer on. While the Transporter team says it’s looking into those types of features in the future, at the moment it’s really more of a personal rackmount, rather than a full-fledged NAS (networked attached storage) replacement.

We’ve felt network server hardware by dealing with our network server hardware data, like videos and photos, that take up too much space for cloud storage yet still need to be shared as well as secured and backed up. Transporter sounds like it fills some of those needs (storage, shareability), but not all of them. The question is, are there enough people out there who need a service like network security for it to be successful? It’s hard to say, but The network server hardware raised more than double its $100,000 goal, plus the company announced today that it has secured $6 million in additional financing.

The Transporter is available to order today, directly from Connected Data. We’re expecting to get a review unit soon, so we can see if its software and services deliver on their promise.

refer to:
http://reviews.cnet.com/8301-3382_7-57566899/connected-but-private-transporter-aims-to-be-your-off-cloud-dropbox/

Stay social with the Acrosser AMB-D255T3 Mini-ITX Board!

To further promote acrosser products, we will continue to enrich our web content and translate our website into more languages for our global audience. This month, Acrosserhas created a short film that highlights its Mini-ITX board, AMB-D255T3, using close-ups to capture its best features from different angles.

One fascinating feature of the AMB-D255T3 is its large-sized heatsink, rendering better thermal conductivity in the board. Secondly, the large amount of intersecting aluminum fins increases heat radiation area as well as heat-dissipation efficiency. The fanless design also eliminates the risk of fan malfunction, raising its product life expectancy. Without a fan, the single board computer AMB-D255T3 can perform steadily in a cool and quiet way.

Using the Intel ATOM D2550 as a base, the AMB-D255T3 was developed to provide abundant peripheral interfaces to meet the needs of different customers. For those looking for expansions, the board provides one Mini PCIe socket for a wireless or storage module. Also, for video interfaces, it features dual displays via VGA, HDMI or 18-bit LVDS, satisfying as many industries as possible.

In conclusion, Acrosser’s AMB-D255T3 is a perfect combination of low power consumption and great computing performance. The complete set of I/O functions allows system integrators to apply our AMB-D255T3 to all sorts of solutions, making their embedded ideas a reality.

Product Information:
http://www.acrosser.com/Products/Single-Board-Computer/Mini-ITX-&-others/AMB-D255T3%E3%80%80(Mini-ITX-)/Intel-Atom-D2550-AMB-D255T3-(Mini-ITX)-.html

Follow us on Twitter!
http://twitter.com/ACROSSERmarcom

Contact us:
http://www.acrosser.com/inquiry.html

Acrosser Introduces the Book-Sized Fanless Mini PC Video

To illustrate the high performance of AES-HM76Z1FL, Acrosser created a short film, explicating the multiple features of our ultra thin embedded system. From its exterior look, this book-sized mini PC embodies great computing performance within its small form factor.

The arrangement of the I/O slot has taken product design and industrial applicability into consideration perfectly. Despite AES-HM76Z1FL’s small form factor, a wide selection of I/O ports including HDMI, USB, LAN, COMBO, GPIO and COM can be found on both sides of the product. Moreover, our model can be integrated horizontally or vertically, making it a flexible option that caters to many different industries. We are sure that these concepts make AES-HM76Z1FL a more feasible choice than other embedded systems.

 

The second part of the video demonstrates the 4 major applications of our AES-HM76Z1FL mentioned in our previous announcement: digital signage, kiosk, industrial automation and home automation. Aside from these four applications, Acrosser believes there are still many other applications for which the AES-HM76Z1FL would be useful.

Through the video, Acrosser was able to demonstrate the best features of the AES-HM76Z1FL, and allow our customers to easily see its power and versatility.

Finally, we would like to offer our gratitude to the vast number of applicants for the Free Product Testing Event. This program is easy to apply to, and still going on right now! Having reached the halfway mark for the event, many system integrators and industrial consultants have already provided plenty of interesting ideas for us. For those who have not applied the event, Acrosser welcomes you to submit your amazing proposals!

Product Information:
http://www.acrosser.com/Products/Embedded-Computer/Fanless-Embedded-Systems/AES-HM76Z1FL/Intel-Core-i3/i7-AES-HM76Z1FL.html

Contact us:
http://www.acrosser.com/inquiry.html

Enhanced Cybersecurity Services: Protecting Critical Infrastructure

Comprehensive cybersecurity is an unfortunate necessity in the connected age, as malwares like Duqu, Flame, and Stuxnet have proven to be effective embedded pc instruments of espionage and physical sabotage rather than vehicles of petty cybercrime. In an effort to mitigate the impact of such threats on United States Critical Infrastructure (CI), the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) developed the Enhanced Cybersecurity Services (ECS) program, a voluntary embedded system framework designed to augment the existing cyber defenses of CI entities. The following provides an overview of the ECS program architecture, technology, and entry qualifications as described in an “on background” interview with DHS embedded pc officials.

At some point in 2007, an operator at the Natanz uranium enrichment facility in Iran inserted a USB memory device infected with the Stuxnet malware into an Industrial Control System (ICS) running a Windows Operating System. Over the next three years, the embedded system would propagate over the Natanz facility’s internal network by exploiting zero-day vulnerabilities in a variety of Windows OSs, eventually gaining access to the Programmable Logic Controllers on a number of Industrial Control Systems (PCSs) for the facility’s gas centrifuges. Stuxnet then injected malicious code to make the centrifuges spin at their maximum degradation point of 1410 Hz. One thousand of the 9,000 centrifuges at the Natanz facility were damaged beyond repair.

In February 2013, Executive Order (EO) 13,636 and Presidential Policy Directive (PPD)-21 ordered the DHS to develop a public-private partnership model to protect United States CI entities from cyber threats like Stuxnet. The result was an expansion of the Enhanced Cybersecurity Services (ECS) program from the Defense Industrial Base (DIB) to 16 critical industrial pc.

Enhanced Cybersecurity Services framework

At its core, the embedded system pc is a voluntary information-sharing framework that facilitates the dissemination of government-furnished cyber threat information to CI entities in both the public and private sectors. Through the program, sensitive and classified embedded system information is collected by agencies across the United States Government (USG) or EINSTEIN sensors1 placed on Federal Civilian Executive Branch (FCEB) agency networks, and then analyzed by DHS to develop “threat indicators”. DHS-developed threat indicators are then provided to Commercial Service Providers (CSPs)2 that, after being vetted and entering a Memorandum of Agreement (MOA) with DHS, may commercially offer approved ECS services to entities that have been validated as part of United States CI. The ECS services can then be used to supplement existing cyber defenses operated by or available to CI entities and CSPs to prevent unauthorized access, exploitation, and data exfiltration.

In addition, CSPs may also provide limited, anonymized, and industrial cybersecurity metrics to the DHS Office of Cybersecurity & Communications (CS&C) with the permission of the participating CI entity. Called Optional Statistical Information Sharing, this practice aids in understanding the effectiveness of the ECS program and its threat indicators, and promotes coordinated protection, prevention, and responses to malicious cyber threats across federal and commercial domains.

Enhanced Cybersecurity Services countermeasures the initial implementation of ECS, including two countermeasures for combating cyber threats: Domain Name Service (DNS) sinkholing and embedded pc e-mail filtering.

DNS sinkholing technology is particularly effective against malwares like Stuxnet that are equipped with distributed command and control network capabilities, which allows threats to open a connection back to a command and control server so that its creators can remotely access it, give it commands, and update it. The DNS sinkholing capability enables CSPs to prevent communication with known or suspected malicious Internet domains by redirecting the network connection away from those domains. Instead, CSPs direct network traffic to “safe servers” or “sinkhole servers,” both hindering the spread of the malware and preventing its communications with embedded pc cyber attackers.

The e-mail filtering capability is effective in combating cyber threats like Duqu, for example, which spread to targets through contaminated Microsoft Word e-mail attachments (also known as phishing), then used a command and control network to exfiltrate data encrypted in image files back to its creators. The e-mail filtering capability enables CSPs to scan attachments, URLs, and other potential malware hidden in e-mail destined for an entity’s networks and potentially quarantine it before delivery to end users.

Accreditation and costs for Enhanced Cybersecurity Services

The CS&C is the DHS executive agent for the ECS program, and executes the CSP security accreditation process and MOAs, as well as validation of CI entities. Any CI entity from one of the 16 key infrastructure sectors can be evaluated for protection under the ECS program, including state, local, tribal, and territorial governments.

For CSPs to complete the security accreditation process, they must sign an MOA with the USG that defines ECS expectations and specific program activities. The MOA works to clarify the CSP’s ability to deliver ECS services commercially while adhering to the program’s security requirements, which include the ability to:

Accept, handle, and safeguard all unclassified and classified indicators from DHS in a Sensitive Compartment Information Facility (SCIF) Retain employee(s) capable of holding classified security clearances for the purposes of handling classified information (clearance sponsorship is provided by DHS)
Implement ECS services in accordance with security guidelines outlined in the network design provided on signing of the embedded pc versions of MOA.

Privacy, confidentiality, and Enhanced Cybersecurity Services

“ECS does not involve government monitoring of private communications or the sharing of communications content with the government by the CSPs,” a DHS official told Industrial embedded systems.  Although CSPs may voluntarily share limited aggregated and anonymized statistical information with the government under the ECS program, ECS related information is not directly shared between customers of the CSPs and the government.

“CS&C may share information received under the ECS program with other USG entities with cybersecurity responsibilities, so long as the practice of sharing information is consistent with its existing policies and procedures. DHS does not control what actions are taken to secure private networks or diminish the voluntary nature of this effort. Nor does DHS monitor actions between the CSPs and the CI entities to which they provide services. CI entities remain in full control of their data and the decisions about how to best secure it.”

refer to:http://industrial-embedded.com/articles/enhanced-protecting-critical-infrastructure/

Fanless Mini-ITX mainboard with Intel Atom Processor “Cedar Trial” D2550

acrosser Technology Co. Ltd, a global professional industrial and Embedded Computerprovider, announces the newMini-ITX mainboard, AMB-D255T3, which carries the Intel dual- core 1.86GHz Atom Processor D2550. AMB-D255T3 features onboard graphics via VGA and HDMI, DDR3 SO-DIMM support, PCI slot, mSATA socket with SATA & USB signals, and ATX connector for easy power in. AMB-D255T3 also provides complete I/O such as 6 x COM ports, 6 x USB2.0 ports, 2 x GbE RJ-45 ports, and 2 x SATA port.
AMB-D255T3 can support dual displays via VGA, HDMI or 18-bit LVDS. AMB-D255T3 has one MiniPCIe type slot and one PCI for customer’s expansion. The MiniPCIe slot works with SATA and USB signals that can be equipped with mSATA storage module.
AMB-D255T3 is certainly an excellent solution for applications that require powerful computing while still maintaining low-power consumption in a small form factor motherboard and has a complete set of I/O functions. Users can deploy the system solution with this fan-less mainboard easily. Ideally, it is a fast time-to-market weapon for system integrators.

Key features:
‧ Intel Atom D2550 1.86GHz
‧ 1 x DDR3 SO-DIMM up to 4GB
‧ 1 x VGA
‧ 1 x HDMI
‧ 1 x 18-bit LVDS
‧ 6 x USB2.0
‧ 6 x COM
‧ 2 x GbE (Realtek RTL8111E)
‧ 1 x PS/2
‧ 1 x KB/MS
‧ 1 x MiniPCIe slot
‧ 1 x PCI slot
‧ 2 x SATA ll
‧ 8-bit GPIO

Product Information:
http://www.acrosser.com/Products/Single-Board-Computer/Mini-ITX-&-others/AMB-D255T3 (Mini-ITX-)/Intel-Atom-D2550-AMB-D255T3-(Mini-ITX)-.html

Contact us:
http://www.acrosser.com/inquiry.html

Automotive Embedded Systems of Android in vehicles

Challenges with Android in the car

In 2012, for the first time in its 26-year history, the J.D. Power Auto Quality Study found that the embedded system is now the biggest source of problems in new cars. Therefore, OEMs are justifiably concerned with the reliability, stability, and security of Android.

Android’s extremely large source code base coupled with its open source development model results in extreme churn – literally thousands of edits per day across Android and its underlying Linux kernel. This guarantees a steady flow of vulnerabilities. A quick search of the U.S. CERT National Vulnerability Database turns up numerous vulnerabilities of varying severity for in-vehicle infotainment systems. Here is a sampling of the worst offenders:

We point these particular vulnerabilities out because they fall into the highest severity category of remote exploitability. They are used by hackers to root Android phones and tablets, and automotive manufacturers want to ensure that the same vulnerabilities do not threaten Android- or Linux-based infotainment systems.

Another concern with Android is driver/passenger safety. Automotive electronics architecture is in the midst of a major trend reversal: Instead of adding more and more processors for new functions, disparate functions are being consolidated into a smaller number of high-performance multicore processors in order to reduce size, weight, power, and component/wiring cost. Processor consolidation is leading safety-critical systems to be integrated with infotainment. The consolidation trend is aided by next-generation, performance-efficient multicore processor platforms, such as the “Jacinto” and OMAPprocessor families including TI’s OMAP 5 platform, which offers a dual-core, power-efficient ARM Cortex-A15 processing architecture.

Additionally, such mixed-criticality system consolidation, for example, includes OEMs looking to host real-time clusters, rear-view cameras, and Advanced Driver Assistance Systems (ADAS) within the center stack computer. Next-generation Android infotainment systems must ensure that applications and multimedia seamlessly interact with safety functions, and pose no risks to passengers.

 

refer to:http://embedded-computing.com/articles/the-future-android-vehicles/

The Reliable Software Developers’ Conference – UK, May 2014

Technology event organiser Energi Technical has announced that it will be launching “The Reliable Software Developers’ Conference”, scheduled for May 2014.

This one-day conference will provide an important forum for engineers and developers working in the development of safety critical systems and high availability systems. It is expected to attract software developers working in such industries as automotive, railway systems, aerospace, bankingmedical and energy. www.rsd-conference.co.uk

“In recent years, software has become so complex that ensuring safety and reliability is now a major challenge,” said Richard Blackburn, Event Organiser. “Many systems now have millions of lines of code and will handle enormous amounts of data. Further to this, modern computer based systems will make millions of decisions every second and also have to be immune to interference and unpredictable events. This event will look at the MISRA coding standards, debug tools and software testing tools that are available to assist software programmers and engineers seeking to develop reliable and safety critical
systems.”

The Reliable Software Developers’ Conference will be co-located with the 2014 UK Device Developers’ Conference. Both will be a one-day conference to be run in Bristol, Cambridge, Northern England and Scotland on May 20th, May 20rd, June 3rd and June 5th.

Delegates attending either event will have the opportunity to sit in on technical presentations and ½ day technical workshops and a attend a vendor exhibition of tools and technology for the development of real-time and embedded systems. www.device-developer-conference.co.uk

“Advanced Debug Tools, Code Test, Version Control, Verification Tools and Software Standards have been a growing feature of recent conferences, so it made sense to create a dedicated event,” said Richard. “There will be a lot expertise available to delegates, and the chance to meet a broad range of vendors of test technologies and tools, all under one roof.”

Developed in collaboration with MISRA (Coding Standards), the Reliable Software Developers’ Conference will feature a number of presentations in the morning, followed by a half-day technical workshop in the afternoon. The presentations will be free and open to delegates of both Conferences, but the half-day workshops will be subject to a charge of £75. Delegates will learn about developments in coding standards, test and verification tools and best practices and it will also be an opportunity to meet with many industry experts.

Refer to:http://embedded-computing.com/news/the-uk-may-2014/