Qseven scalability QUICK CHECK

The ability to transition between x86 and ARM embedded computer processors is critical for low-volume medical applications because a single carrier board – often the most costly component of a COM architecture – can suit the needs of both graphics-intensive systems and platforms that require more mobility and lower power. In addition to reducing Time-To-Market (TTM), this decreases Bill Of Materials (BOM) costs and eases Board Support Package (BSP) implementation, says Christoph Budelmann, General Manager, Budelmann Elektronik GmbH in Münster, Germany (www.budelmann-elektronik.com).

“Scalability is a key factor, especially for lower embedded computer volumes, and the Qseven standard offers the possibility to use the same baseboard with different processors depending on the user’s needs,” Budelmann says. “Some users only need a small control unit and prefer a simple ARM processor, whereas other customers want to implement large screens and need the graphical power of an x86 system. Of course, this can also be the case in medical applications. Even if the baseboard has to be adapted to very special demands, this is less complex than switching from a pure ARM platform to an x86 platform or vice versa. In the majority of cases, only some drivers, such as Ethernet PHY, have to be exchanged whereas the real application software can remain the same.”

refer to: http://smallformfactors.com/articles/qseven-coms-healthcare-mobile/

Innovation driven by In-Vehicle electronics

High-end electronics provide drivers and passengers with in-car navigation and in-vehicle entertainment and information delivered over a wireless network. In fact, many car buyers today care more about the infotainment embedded system in the dashboard than what’s under the hood. This phenomenon is requiring additional in-vehicle storage space for rich multimedia data and advanced software and applications and is driving an explosive growth of both volatile and nonvolatile memories. Embedded multimedia cards are helping meet this demand in today’s memory-hungry automotives.

The automotive market is moderately but steadily growing. Global car sales rose 6 percent year-on-year in the first half of 2012, despite the ongoing headwinds associated with the sovereign debt problems in Western Europe and some moderation in the pace of global economic activity. Global sales of passenger in-vehicle cars and light commercial vehicles are expected to grow from 78 million units in 2011 to more than 100 million units in 2018. In a recent study, Gartner confirmed that electronics are playing a major role in the advancement of automotive technology. Electronic content in cars has been steadily increasing since the first digital engine control modules were introduced in the ’80s.

refer to: http://embedded-computing.com/articles/automotive-industry-innovation-driven-electronics/#at_pco=cfd-1.0

Engineered embedded COTS for network systems

In recent years, embedded building, maintaining, and evolving proprietary network systems for telecom-grade applications that are highly available and “always on” have become increasingly prohibitive from the perspective of cost, risk management, time to revenue, and so on. The embedded custom-built approach becomes even less cost effective as Communications Service Providers (CSPs) move toward offering cloud-based services, where they have to compete with non-traditional providers that offer such services on networks built using Commercial Off-The-Shelf (COTS) building blocks….

refer to: http://xtca-systems.com/articles/engineered-cots-network-systems/